Thank you for visiting the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department website. www.wildlife.state.nh.us NH Fish and Game

 

 

Watch for this Southern Songbird and More -- New Issue of NH Wildlife Journal

Contact:
Jane Vachon: (603) 271-3211
Becky Johnson: (603) 271-3211

March 30, 2017

MEDIA: For hi-res image of the magazine cover for use in print, visit

www.wildnh.com/pubs/images/wj-cover.jpg

 

CONCORD, N.H. -- Invasion of the teakettles?  Explore this wildlife mystery and more in the new issue of New Hampshire Wildlife Journal magazine (March/April 2017). Hint: A once-rare southern songbird is now making the Granite State its home.

 

Also in this issue, come along as a newbie explores the intriguing world of fly fishing with the help of seasoned Let’s Go Fishing instructors.

 

Those enthusiastically awaiting the rumble of the spring stocking trucks will enjoy an inside look at the work of our state fish hatcheries, where nearly a million catchable-sized trout are raised each year for New Hampshire anglers.

 

Regular columns include an introduction to the secretive slimy sculpin, a funny-looking fish whose presence indicates a healthy aquatic ecosystem. Follow the trail of migrating river herring in Wild Ways. Wild Places offers a stroll among the boulders at Pawtuckaway State Park. And the ever-popular Warden’s Watch column lets you ride along with Conservation Officers in the field.

 

Not a subscriber to New Hampshire Wildlife Journal? The magazine is published 6 times a year by the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department. Subscriptions are just $12 for one year -- that’s 40% off the cover price -- or $20 for two years. A great gift idea!

 

Don’t Miss an Issue:  Subscribe online or by mail at www.wildnh.com/pubs/wj-magazine.html.  Limited quantities of past issues are also available for purchase.

 

New Hampshire Wildlife Journal magazine contains no commercial advertising. Subscription revenue helps the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department conserve and manage the state's fish and wildlife, promote conservation education and maintain opportunities for outdoor recreation in the Granite State. Visit www.wildnh.com.


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