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Pollock

 

Pollock

 

pollack

 

pollack

Scientific Name: Pollachius virens


Common Names: American pollock, Boston bluefish

 

American pollock are distributed along North American continental waters from Labrador to North Carolina. Attempts to define distinct breeding stocks within this expansive western Atlantic range have, so far, yielded inconclusive results – thus, the entire U.S. pollock population is assessed as a single unit. Within New Hampshire waters, pollock are found offshore, near the coast, and in the harbors.

 

The pollock is an active fish living at all depths, depending on the food supply, which includes small invertebrates, shrimp and baitfish. Some generalized distribution of pollock by size class is evident. Larger fish tend to be found deeper and farther from the coast, while small pollock (often called “harbor pollock”) are more likely to be near the surface. The pollock is a late fall, early winter spawner. All females are sexually mature by the time they reach 27 inches in length. Pollock are identifiable by their olive green color, three dorsal fins and small chin barbel.

 

Distinguishing pollock from its two close relatives and sometime associates, cod and haddock, is easily done by looking at color and external markings. Pollock caught by hook may range in size from 10 to 16 inches (harbor pollock), with up to 2- and 3-foot fish encountered offshore.

 

Catching Pollock: Recreational anglers, casting with light spinning gear, may take small harbor pollock from inshore waters near breakwaters or other structures. Larger pollock may be taken offshore in deeper waters. Pollock are caught with either artificial lures, such as diamond jigs and mackerel trees, or with bait, such as clam necks and clam worms.